Modern movements in the Fashion realm are transcending previous boundaries.  A style where rage is literally ’ The Rage’.  By combining derelict with tribal, designers are creating an Armageddon image to suit the chaotic living experience of today, reflecting the realities of global warming, our changing climate and the social consequences of the collapse of capitalism fuelling our loss of faith in politicians and feelings of disenfranchisement.
Armageddon style is a blend of glam and grunge, providing an outlet for individual customisation based along personal perception and judgment of the times we live in.  A style without rule or rhyme, Armageddon post-apocalyptic style builds a stage for the truly creative to explore their style and own fashion agenda.
Post-apocalyptic fashion portrays a hint of the new power woman, using statement black and metallic coupled with a signature cape combines a powerful look with a powerful choice: the power to choose who you are and what your clothing shows you represent.  Opportunities for further individual statement are provided by the vast and dynamic accessories available.  From leather studded bangles to spiked metal earrings, fashion conscious individuals can fully decorate their outfits suitable for outfits of jeans, t-shirt and jacket right through to elegant evening dress.
Fashion designers picking up on this trend include Christopher Kane who has recently released a new range of accessories and clothing for Topshop.  Kane’s collection draws on the glamour of grunge, interspersing power black with strong images and metal.
A reflection of the times, grunge meets glamour portrays a mirror of the fashion during the 1930s Great Depression.  Through clever use of glamorous items such as the re-invention of the top hat, designers are reconstituting imagery of the time thus engineering the match of our current financial climate today with that of the 1930s.  A comment on the cyclical boom and bust of capitalist greed, Armageddon fashion links the two through a modern day twist on thirties fashion.
Further opportunity for comment is given through the continued 1980s revival theme witnessed throughout this trend.  With mention given to the seminal 1980s Mad Max film, evidence of a Tina Turner-esque image is conjured through the use of metal, interesting material cuts and bizarre pairing of individual items to create outfits designed to sit far apart from the norm.  Inspired by 1980s rebellion mindset, Armageddon design permits wearers to rebel through the medium of fashion, making their comment on lifestyle today using the sound of image, not voice.
Modern movements in the Fashion realm are transcending previous boundaries.  A style where rage is literally ’ The Rage’.  By combining derelict with tribal, designers are creating an Armageddon image to suit the chaotic living experience of today, reflecting the realities of global warming, our changing climate and the social consequences of the collapse of capitalism fuelling our loss of faith in politicians and feelings of disenfranchisement.
Armageddon style is a blend of glam and grunge, providing an outlet for individual customisation based along personal perception and judgment of the times we live in.  A style without rule or rhyme, Armageddon post-apocalyptic style builds a stage for the truly creative to explore their style and own fashion agenda.
Post-apocalyptic fashion portrays a hint of the new power woman, using statement black and metallic coupled with a signature cape combines a powerful look with a powerful choice: the power to choose who you are and what your clothing shows you represent.  Opportunities for further individual statement are provided by the vast and dynamic accessories available.  From leather studded bangles to spiked metal earrings, fashion conscious individuals can fully decorate their outfits suitable for outfits of jeans, t-shirt and jacket right through to elegant evening dress.
Fashion designers picking up on this trend include Christopher Kane who has recently released a new range of accessories and clothing for Topshop.  Kane’s collection draws on the glamour of grunge, interspersing power black with strong images and metal.
A reflection of the times, grunge meets glamour portrays a mirror of the fashion during the 1930s Great Depression.  Through clever use of glamorous items such as the re-invention of the top hat, designers are reconstituting imagery of the time thus engineering the match of our current financial climate today with that of the 1930s.  A comment on the cyclical boom and bust of capitalist greed, Armageddon fashion links the two through a modern day twist on thirties fashion.
Further opportunity for comment is given through the continued 1980s revival theme witnessed throughout this trend.  With mention given to the seminal 1980s Mad Max film, evidence of a Tina Turner-esque image is conjured through the use of metal, interesting material cuts and bizarre pairing of individual items to create outfits designed to sit far apart from the norm.  Inspired by 1980s rebellion mindset, Armageddon design permits wearers to rebel through the medium of fashion, making their comment on lifestyle today using the sound of image, not voice.
Modern movements in the Fashion realm are transcending previous boundaries.  A style where rage is literally ’ The Rage’.  By combining derelict with tribal, designers are creating an Armageddon image to suit the chaotic living experience of today, reflecting the realities of global warming, our changing climate and the social consequences of the collapse of capitalism fuelling our loss of faith in politicians and feelings of disenfranchisement.
Armageddon style is a blend of glam and grunge, providing an outlet for individual customisation based along personal perception and judgment of the times we live in.  A style without rule or rhyme, Armageddon post-apocalyptic style builds a stage for the truly creative to explore their style and own fashion agenda.
Post-apocalyptic fashion portrays a hint of the new power woman, using statement black and metallic coupled with a signature cape combines a powerful look with a powerful choice: the power to choose who you are and what your clothing shows you represent.  Opportunities for further individual statement are provided by the vast and dynamic accessories available.  From leather studded bangles to spiked metal earrings, fashion conscious individuals can fully decorate their outfits suitable for outfits of jeans, t-shirt and jacket right through to elegant evening dress.
Fashion designers picking up on this trend include Christopher Kane who has recently released a new range of accessories and clothing for Topshop.  Kane’s collection draws on the glamour of grunge, interspersing power black with strong images and metal.
A reflection of the times, grunge meets glamour portrays a mirror of the fashion during the 1930s Great Depression.  Through clever use of glamorous items such as the re-invention of the top hat, designers are reconstituting imagery of the time thus engineering the match of our current financial climate today with that of the 1930s.  A comment on the cyclical boom and bust of capitalist greed, Armageddon fashion links the two through a modern day twist on thirties fashion.
Further opportunity for comment is given through the continued 1980s revival theme witnessed throughout this trend.  With mention given to the seminal 1980s Mad Max film, evidence of a Tina Turner-esque image is conjured through the use of metal, interesting material cuts and bizarre pairing of individual items to create outfits designed to sit far apart from the norm.  Inspired by 1980s rebellion mindset, Armageddon design permits wearers to rebel through the medium of fashion, making their comment on lifestyle today using the sound of image, not voice.Modern movements in the Fashion realm are transcending previous boundaries.A style where rage is literallyThe Rage’.By combining derelict with tribal, designers are creating an Armageddon image to suit the chaotic living experience of today, reflecting the realities of global warming, our changing climate and the social consequences of the collapse of capitalism fuelling our loss of faith in politicians and feelings of disenfranchisement.

Post apocalyptic fashionArmageddon style

Armageddon style is a blend of glam and grunge, providing an outlet for individual customisation based along personal perception and judgment of the times we live in.A style without rule or rhyme, Armageddon post-apocalyptic style builds a stage for the truly creative to explore their style and own fashion agenda.

Post-apocalyptic fashion portrays a hint of the new power woman, using statement black and metallic coupled with a signature cape combines a powerful look with a powerful choice: the power to choose who you are and what your clothing shows you represent.Opportunities for further individual statement are provided by the vast and dynamic accessories available.From leather studded bangles to spiked metal earrings, fashion conscious individuals can fully decorate their outfits suitable for jeans, t-shirt and jacket right through to elegant evening dress.

Fashion designers picking up on this trend include Christopher Kane who has recently released a new range of accessories and clothing for Topshop.Kane’s collection draws on the glamour of grunge, interspersing power black with strong images and metal.

A reflection of the times, grunge meets glamour portrays a mirror of the fashion during the 1930s Great Depression.Through clever use of glamorous items such as the re-invention of the top hat,  designers are reconstituting imagery of the time thus engineering the match of our current financial climate today with that of the 1930s.  A comment on the cyclical boom and bust of capitalist greed,  Armageddon fashion links the two through a modern day twist on thirties fashion.

Further opportunity for comment is given through the continued 1980s revival theme witnessed throughout this trend.With mention given to the seminal 1980s Mad Max film, evidence of a Tina Turner-esque image is conjured through the use of metal, interesting material cuts and bizarre pairing of individual items to create outfits designed to sit far apart from the norm.Inspired by 1980s rebellion mindset, Armageddon design permits wearers to rebel through the medium of fashion, making their comment on lifestyle today using the sound of image, not voice.